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Publication numberUS966143 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date2 Aug 1910
Filing date22 Apr 1909
Priority date22 Apr 1909
Publication numberUS 966143 A, US 966143A, US-A-966143, US966143 A, US966143A
InventorsWalter Van Wie
Original AssigneeWalter Van Wie
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Revolving kite.
US 966143 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W. VAN W115.-

REVOLVING KITE.

APPLICATION FILED 1123.22, 1909.

Patented Aug. 2, 1910.

WALTER VAN WIE, OF SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA.

REVOLVING KITE.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Aug. 2, 1910.

Application filed April 22, 1909. Serial No. 491,453.

To all whom 'it may concern:

Be it known that I, \VAL'rnn VAN VVIE, a citizen of the United States, residing at San Diego, in the county of San Diego and State of California, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Revolving Kites, of

which the following is aspecification.

A further object is to provide means for securing the vanesin such a manner that the full force of the air current will be utilized.

A further object of my invention is to provide a new and novel mounting for the kite frame by means of which the friction due to the rotation of the same will be reduced to a minimum.

A further object is to provide means by which the 0st or standard to which the kite frame 1s connected is maintained at an inclination and prevented from rotating.

With these and other objects in view, the present invention consists in'the combination and arrangement of parts as will be hereinafter more fully described, and articularly pointed out in the appended claims, it being understood that changes in the specific structure shown and described may be made within the scope of the claims without departing from the spirit of the invention.

In the drawings forming a portion of this specification, and in which like numerals of reference indicate similar parts in the several views, Figure 1 is a perspective view of my improved rotatory kite, Fig. 2 is an enlarged vertical section of the upper end of standard illustrating the mounting of the rotatable shaft, Fig. 3 1s a detail perspective view of one of the vanes detached, Fig. 4 is a transverse section on the line 44 of Fig. 2, Fig. 5 is a detail view of one of the vanes illustrating a slightly modified construction.

In the drawings, 1 indicates a circular frame the ends ofwhich overlap and are secured together by the screws 3. Equally spaced from each other and secured to the frame are the wings or vanes 4. These vanes are triangular in shape and comprise a wooden frame 5 covered by stout paper 5 preferably oiled. At each of the vertices of the vanes a string 6 is attached, one of which is slightly greater in length than the remaining two. One of the shorter strings is for the purpose of securing the vanes at their inner vertices, the other being tied to the frame 1. The longer strings are also secured to the frame but so as to allow the vanes considerable play and as shown in Fig. 1 they roject outwardly at an acute angle to the rame. Secured to the frame at three equidistant points and to the vertices of the vanes in the center thereof are the cords 7. These cords have their outer ends secured to the end of a short shaft 8, which is rotatably secured in the upper end of a member 10, the center of gravity of which is located below the shaft 8, and which member will be termed a pendule. To provide a bearing surface for the head 8 of'said shaft, I secure thereto the Wear plate 9, provided with a central boss 11. The ends of the plate 9 are bent and firmly clamped to the' post 10. The shaft 8 extends entirely through the pendule and the headS thereof bears against the boss. formed on the plate 9 which is greatly restricted in diameter thereby reducing the friction to a minimum. The pendule 10 has one of its vertical surfaces 12 beveled. It is principally by means of this beveled surface that the pendule is maintained in an approximately "constant position with respect to the vertical when the air currents impinge against the same. Were the surfaces of the pendule 10 cut at right angles to each other, the pendule itself would be liable to rotate in a wind ofany very great velocity. The beveled side of the pendule is so disposed as to oppose its rotary tendency to the friction of the shaft on the wear plate. Upon either side of the shaft is secured a short cord 13 which is connected to the operating cord 14. This arrangement of the cords is also anaid in maintaining the pendule in a substantial? vertical position and overcoming any ten ency of the'same to rotate with the frame.

The vanes 4 are securely held against any movement due to centrifugal force, when the 3 sutiicieut outward play of the vanes is secured to allow for the free passage of the air currents between the same thus prevent.- iug the damaging of the vanes. As the wind impinges against the vanes, the frame and the shaft mounted in the upper end of the pendule will be rotated. On account of the disposition of the vanes in the frame 1, it. will take but a very light current of'air to produce the desired rotation of the same. It may be found desirable to supplantthe long string by an elastic connection adapted to yield to pressure on the vane so that as the wind becomes greater, the angles at which the vanes lie with respect to the dircction of the wind, will become less acute and relieve strain on the kite.

An object of the frame 1 is to provide a gyroscopic element tending to overcome irregular and unsteady movement in the kite.

From the foregoing it will be seen that I have devised a kite which is extremely simple and inexpensive in construction, and in which the various parts can readily be replaced when they become worn or broken at but a trifling cost. I

In Fig. 5, I have shown a slightly modified form of the vanes which would preferably be employed when only an extremely light wind is available. In this form I provide a triangle of stout cord or twine 14: and secure thereto a piece of cloth 15 of similar shape. The cloth is made a trifle large so that it will catch and hold the Wind, bellying outward and revolving the kite frame. By this means the rotation of the kite is assured, however light the wind may be.

What is claimed is 1. In a device of the class described, the combination with a rotatable frame, of vanes secured to said frame and to each other, a pendule having one of its sides laterally beveled, connections between said frame and pendule, and a cord secured to said pendule for the purpose set forth. 7

2. In a device of'the class described, the combination with a circular rotatable frame, of vanes secured to the frame and to each other, a pendule, a shaft rotatably mounted in said pendule, a plurality of cords connecting the frame to the shaft, and another cord secured to said pendule for the purpose set forth.

3. In a device of the class described, the combination with a rotatable circular frame, of triangular vanes each having one of its vertices secured at the center of said frame, means for securing said vanes to said frame,

a pendule, a shaft rotatably mounted in said pendule, cords connecting the frame and the teams said vertices of said vanes to said shaft, and a cord secured to said pendule for the purpose set forth.

4. In a device. of the class described, the combination with a rotatable circular frame, of triangular vanes provided at each of their vertices with a cord, one of said cords of each vane being longer than the others, one of the shorter cords of each of said vanes being secured together at the center of said frame, the remaining cords being secured to the periphery of said frame, a pendule, a shaft rotatably mounted in said pendule, cords connecting the frame and the vertices of said vanes at their points of connection to said shaft, and a cord secured to said pendule for the purpose set forth.

5. In a device of the class described, the combination with a circular frame, of triangular vanes provided at each of their vertices with a cord, the cords connected to the inner vertices being secured together at the center of the frame, the remaining cords being secured to the periphery of the frame, one of said last mentioned cords being of greater length than the other, a pendule having one of its sides beveled. a shaft rotatably mounted in one end of said pendule, a wearing plate provided with a central boss secured to said pendule, cords connecting said frame and the centrally positioned connected vertices of said vanes to said shaft, cords connected to said pendule upon either side of said shaft and to another cord, substantially as and for the purpose set forth.

(3. In a device of the class described, the combination with a rotatable member, of a pendule revolubly connected therewith having one of its sides beveled for engagement by wind pressure to hold the pendule against rotation with said rotatable member.

7. In a kite, supporting plane surfaces concentrically arranged and inclined to produce rotation thereof, and an annular member carried thereby for gyroscopic action, and controlling means engaged with the device.

8. In a device of the class described, a plurality of concentrically arranged lifting vanes inclined to produce rotation thereof in a common direction for gyroscopic governing of the device, a revoluble member connected'to the vanes and a controlling member carried thereby.

In testimony whereof I afiix my signature, in presence of two Witnesses.

WALTER VAN WIE.

Witnesses:

BESSIE HENNING, MAY ATKINS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2524500 *23 Nov 19483 Oct 1950Earl M WhitehurstKite
US2648508 *25 Apr 195011 Aug 1953Franklin P BellKite
US2701697 *14 Nov 19498 Feb 1955Radioplane CompanyRotating parachute
US2770432 *9 Nov 195313 Nov 1956Nat Res CouneilParachute with rotating canopy
US3770229 *30 Apr 19716 Nov 1973U SeefluthToy airplane
US4113209 *11 Oct 197712 Sep 1978Lewis RodgersRotating kite
US4685642 *10 Oct 198611 Aug 1987Alden SchlossRotary kite
US5598988 *13 Apr 19954 Feb 1997Bukur; Thomas J.Rotary flyer
US5954297 *3 Feb 199721 Sep 1999Bukur; Thomas J.Rotary flyer
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA63H27/082